Spring haiku

Early spring -- a great day for a walk ... and poetry

Pink trees everywhere,
So perfect, what could go wrong?
Uh oh … wait … a-choo!

NOTES:  We’re having a late spring here in western Washington.  Cold weather and rain has suppressed the buds and tree pollen that usually afflict me from March 1 to March 30 like clockwork.

I thought, perhaps, I was going to somehow avoid my alder and cedar tormentors this spring.  Silly me.  This week, the rain paused, the temperature rose, and the pollen bloomed.


Spring haiku

Mostly obstructed view of the Cascades

Such a great view here.
The Cascades are breathtaking.
You’ll need to trust me.

Spring haiku

Bobby Ball standing in the DuBois' driveway, late 1960s. on Rea Street.
Courtesy of Susumu Wakana

There once was a time
when blossoms and I were both
fresh and unabashed.

NOTES: When I was a junior, my high school hosted a foreign exchange student from Japan.  Susumu stayed with the DuBois family, who lived a few blocks away.

A couple of years ago, through the miracle of Facebook, I reconnected with Susumu.  When I discovered he had taken several photos of his days in my hometown, I was excited.  He very kindly shared them with me, and I have been lovingly looking through them and rekindling old memories.

Those photos include precious images of teachers long since gone.  Of friends and classmates not seen for decades.  And simple scenes of my hometown, a town that has changed so much since I walked its streets.

One of the photos was of me.  I don’t remember it being taken.  All evidence points to it being the spring of 1969.  I am outfitted in what passed for a tennis uniform in those days.  I must have just finished practicing with Susumu’s host brother, Dave DuBois.  We were teammates on the Marshall High School tennis team, and we practiced out on the new hard surface courts at Missouri Valley College.

From the foliage, it was early spring.  The tulip tree was in full bloom, but the other trees had not leafed out.  I wore a leather bracelet on my right wrist, which was the cool, hippie thing to do.

My hair was growing out and would need to be cut before football practice started in August.  (Coach Cecil Naylor really didn’t like long hair!)

Ah.  If I only knew then what I know now.


Early spring haiku

Early spring -- a great day for a walk ... and poetry
Early spring and a great day for a walk

It is with great humility that I attempt haiku. I suspect I’m only scratching the surface.  Just barely.

When I consider the old masters, there seems to be so much more to it than just 5/7/5. For one thing, the lettering and drawings were part of the art of haiku. That pretty much eliminates me. My fine motor skills being what they are eliminated brain surgeon and artist from my career choices long ago.

Then there is the way the old masters looked at the world. They came from such a different culture, steeped in Zen. Like I said in an earlier post, I’m not sure I actually “get” haiku.

But then, from time to time, I catch that glimpse of beauty and truth, and I’m back in. Just when I think I’m committing fraud trying to compose haiku, I read something by Issa and I am reminded of this: He was just a human being. I’m just a human being. We’ve got a lot more in common than is apparent on the surface.

So, with that disclaimer, here are a few meager offerings:

Spring Haiku

Great day to walk, dog.
You poop, I’ll write some verse.
We’ll both be happy.

Old dog so blind and deaf
We’ll never finish our walk …
Sniffs every tree!

Plum trees bloomed early
For us old dog. I don’t mind
If we walk all day.

Pink trees everywhere,
So perfect, what could go wrong?
Uh oh … wait … a-choo!