Hawaii haiku

Kilauea
Surely this must be the roof of hell

I never really understood Issa’s haiku about the roof of hell until I visited Hawaii’s Big Island. We hiked for miles around the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

It was like walking on the moon. Except with full gravity. Over jagged rock formations. Boulder fields. Through pebble fields. Past sulfur-stinking steam vents. Up and down. A death march.  There were times when you could look around and swear you were on another planet.

It inspired a few syllables of my own:

“We walk the roof of
Hell,” said Issa. He must have
hiked Kilauea

Issa’s original poem went like this:

In this world
we walk on the roof of hell
gazing at flowers

Much more profound than mine.  But I appreciate his inspiration.

Issa was a poet and Buddhist priest who lived from 1763 to 1828.   Which means he was coming of age just as American was becoming a nation.

He’s considered one of the four great haiku masters along with Basho, Buson, and Shiki.

His full name was Kobayashi Issa, but he went simply by the name Issa, which literally means “cup of,” or “one cup of tea.”  What a great name for a haiku master!

I like his stuff and I’ll likely be coming back to it from time to time.

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